TibotSkin ProblemViral InfectionsHerpes Simplex

Herpes Simplex

This is caused by a small DNA virus of two antigenic types, I and II. Type II herpes simplex infects the genitalia and type I is responsible for the common herpetic infection of the face and oropharynx and, less commonly, elsewhere.

The initial infection may be quite unpleasant, with severe stomatitis, systemic upset and pyrexia mostly in infants. Resolution takes place in about 10 days. Reactivation of the herpes infection occurs at varying intervals. Up to 20 percent of the population suffers from recurrent cold sores, so named because the disorder is often precipitated by minor pyrexial disorders. It may also be precipitated by sun exposure. Commonly, the lesions occur around the mouth or on the lip. They start as grouped, tender and/or painful papules or papulovesicles and then coalesce to form crusted erosion. The sequence takes some 7–14 days from initial discomfort to the final pink macule marking where lesions have been.

There are two types of the herpes simplex virus.

  • HSV-1: Also known as oral herpes, this type can cause cold sores and fever blisters around the mouth and on the face.
  • HSV-2: This type is generally responsible for genital herpes outbreaks.

HSV-1 infections transmitted via saliva are common in children, although primary herpes gingivostomatitis can be observed at any age.

Need to understand that someone may not have visible sores or symptoms and still be infected by the virus. They transmit the virus to others.

Symptoms associated with this virus include:

  • blistering sores (in the mouth or on the genitals)
  • pain during urination (genital herpes)
  • itching

Patient may also experience symptoms that are similar to the flu. These symptoms can include:

  • fever
  • swollen lymph nodes
  • headache
  • tiredness
  • lack of appetite

HSV can also spread to the eyes, causing a condition called herpes keratitis. This can cause symptoms such as eye pain, discharge, and a gritty feeling in the eye.

The herpes simplex virus is a contagious virus that can be passed from person to person through direct contact. Children will often contract HSV-1 from early contact with an infected adult. They then carry the virus with them for the rest of their lives.

HSV-1: It is spread through skin-to-skin contact. Infection with HSV-1 can happen from general interactions such as:

  • eating from the same utensils,
  • sharing lip balm,
  • kissing.

The virus spreads more quickly when an infected person is experiencing an outbreak. Anywhere from 30 to 95 percent of adults are seropositive for HSV-1, though they may never experience an outbreak. It’s also possible to get genital herpes from HSV-1 if someone who performed oral sex had cold sores during that time.

HSV-2: HSV-2 is contracted through forms of sexual contact with a person who has HSV-2. It is estimated that around 20% of sexually active adults infected with HSV-2. While HSV-2 infections are spread through contact with a herpes sore, People get HSV-1 from an infected person who is asymptomatic, or does not have sores.

There is currently no cure for this virus. Treatment focuses on getting rid of sores and limiting outbreaks. Most patients do not require treatment. Idoxuridine is a viral metabolic antagonist, which, as a 5 per cent lotion, can shorten the disorder if started early and used frequently.

It is possible that sores will disappear without treatment. However, doctor may determine that, need one or more of the following medications:

  • acyclovir,
  • famciclovir,
  • valacyclovir.

These medications can help infected individuals reduce the risk of spreading the virus to others. The medications also help to lower the intensity and frequency of outbreaks. These medications may come in oral (pill) form, or may be applied as a cream. For severe outbreaks, these medications may also be administered by injection.

If suspect have genital herpes, or any other sexually transmitted infection, consult a doctor.

  • Oxford hand Book of medical Dermatology
  • ABC Of Dermatology
  • Andrew’s Diseases of the skin
TibotSkin ProblemViral InfectionsHerpes Simplex

Herpes Simplex

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

This is caused by a small DNA virus of two antigenic types, I and II. Type II herpes simplex infects the genitalia and type I is responsible for the common herpetic infection of the face and oropharynx and, less commonly, elsewhere.

The initial infection may be quite unpleasant, with severe stomatitis, systemic upset and pyrexia mostly in infants. Resolution takes place in about 10 days. Reactivation of the herpes infection occurs at varying intervals. Up to 20 percent of the population suffers from recurrent cold sores, so named because the disorder is often precipitated by minor pyrexial disorders. It may also be precipitated by sun exposure. Commonly, the lesions occur around the mouth or on the lip. They start as grouped, tender and/or painful papules or papulovesicles and then coalesce to form crusted erosion. The sequence takes some 7–14 days from initial discomfort to the final pink macule marking where lesions have been.

There are two types of the herpes simplex virus.

  • HSV-1: Also known as oral herpes, this type can cause cold sores and fever blisters around the mouth and on the face.
  • HSV-2: This type is generally responsible for genital herpes outbreaks.

HSV-1 infections transmitted via saliva are common in children, although primary herpes gingivostomatitis can be observed at any age.

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Dr. Lora Smith

MBBS (Dhaka), DGO (DU) Ex SR. Gynaecologist & Obstetrician

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