TibotSkin ProblemPsoriasisArthropathic Psoriasis

Arthropathic Psoriasis

Psoriatic arthritis is a type of arthritis that develops in some people with the skin condition psoriasis. It typically causes affected joints to become inflamed (swollen), stiff and painful. They can affect any part of body, including fingertips and spine, and can range from relatively mild to severe. In both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, disease flares may alternate with periods of remission.

Arthropathic Psoriasis

With an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, it’s possible to slow down the progression of the condition and minimize or prevent permanent damage to the joints.

No cure for psoriatic arthritis exists, so the focus is on controlling symptoms and preventing damage to joints. Without treatment, psoriatic arthritis may be disabling. There are five types of psoriatic arthritis.

  • Symmetric psoriatic arthritis,
  • Asymmetric psoriatic arthritis,
  • Distal interphalangeal predominant psoriatic arthritis,
  • Spondylitis psoriatic arthritis,
  • Psoriatic arthritis mutilans.

Psoriasis can affect people of any age, both male and female, but psoriatic arthritis tends to affect more adults than young people.

Symptoms of psoriatic arthritis are different for each person. They can be mild to severe. The pain, swelling and stiffness (morning) associated with psoriatic arthritis can affect any joint in the body, but the condition often affects the hands, feet, knees, neck, spine and elbows.

The severity of the condition can vary considerably from person to person. Some people may have severe problems affecting many joints, whereas others may only notice mild symptoms in 1 or 2 joints.

Both psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis are chronic diseases that get worse over time, but may have periods when symptoms improve or go into remission alternating with times when symptoms become worse.

Relapses can be very difficult to predict, but can often be managed with medication when they do occur.

The arthritis and the skin condition are both caused by inflammation. The processes of inflammation are very similar in the skin and the joints.

Around 2 in every 5 people with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis.

It usually develops within 10 years of psoriasis being diagnosed. Some people may experience problems with their joints before they notice any symptoms affecting their skin.

This is unknown exactly what triggers the inflammation in psoriatic arthritis. It’s not clear why some people with psoriasis develop psoriatic arthritis and others don’t.

Perhaps an infection – acts as a trigger in people who are already at risk of this type of arthritis because of the genes they’ve inherited from their parents. No specific infection has yet been found, and it may be that a variety of infections can trigger the disease, for example bacteria that live in patches of psoriasis.

Sometimes the arthritis can follow physical trauma, particularly if it affects a single joint. People who are overweight are more at risk of developing both psoriasis and the arthritis linked with this.

No cure exists for psoriatic arthritis, so treatment focuses on controlling inflammation in affected joints to prevent joint pain and disability.

Topical treatments: Creams, gels, lotions, and ointments can relieve the itchy psoriatic arthritis rash. Options include: anthralin, calcitriol or calcipotriene, which are forms of vitamin D-3, salicylic acid, steroid creams, tazarotene, which is a derivative of vitamin A.

Medications: Drugs used to treat psoriatic arthritis include:

  • NSAIDs: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. NSAIDs include: ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen sodium. COX-2 inhibitors: celecoxib or etoricoxib.
  • Corticosteroids: Like NSAIDs, corticosteroids can help reduce pain and swelling.
  • Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: These drugs can slow the progression of psoriatic arthritis and save the joints and other tissues from permanent damage. It includes: methotrexate, leflunomide, and sulfasalazine.
  • Immunosuppressants: These medications act to tame in immune system, which is out of control in psoriatic arthritis. It includes: azathioprine and cyclosporine. These medications can increase susceptibility to infection.
  • TNF-alpha inhibitors: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory substance produced by body. TNF-alpha inhibitors can help reduce pain, morning stiffness, and tender or swollen joints. It includes: etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab and certolizumab.
  • Other medications: apremilast, ustekinumab and secukinumab.

Surgical and other procedures:

  • Steroid injections: This type of medication reduces inflammation quickly and is sometimes injected into an affected joint.
  • Joint replacement surgery: Joints that have been severely damaged by psoriatic arthritis can be replaced with artificial prostheses made of metal and plastic.

Light therapy and other psoriatic arthritis medicines: Light therapy uses medicine, followed by exposure to bright light, to treat psoriasis skin rashes.

A few other medications also treat the symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. These include secukinumab and ustekinumab. These drugs are injected under skin.

Visit a doctor if experience persistent pain, swelling or stiffness in joints – even if haven’t been diagnosed with psoriasis.

In psoriasis, discuss with a doctor if develop joint pain. Psoriatic arthritis can severely damage joints if left untreated.

In diagnosed with psoriasis, need to visit with a doctor, least once a year to monitor the condition.

  • Oxford hand Book of medical Dermatology
  • Roxburgh’s common skin diseases
  • Andrew’s Diseases of the skin.
TibotSkin ProblemPsoriasisArthropathic Psoriasis

Arthropathic Psoriasis

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

Psoriatic arthritis is a type of arthritis that develops in some people with the skin condition psoriasis. It typically causes affected joints to become inflamed (swollen), stiff and painful. They can affect any part of body, including fingertips and spine, and can range from relatively mild to severe. In both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, disease flares may alternate with periods of remission.

Arthropathic Psoriasis

With an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, it’s possible to slow down the progression of the condition and minimize or prevent permanent damage to the joints.

No cure for psoriatic arthritis exists, so the focus is on controlling symptoms and preventing damage to joints. Without treatment, psoriatic arthritis may be disabling. There are five types of psoriatic arthritis.

  • Symmetric psoriatic arthritis,
  • Asymmetric psoriatic arthritis,
  • Distal interphalangeal predominant psoriatic arthritis,
  • Spondylitis psoriatic arthritis,
  • Psoriatic arthritis mutilans.

Psoriasis can affect people of any age, both male and female, but psoriatic arthritis tends to affect more adults than young people.

Recommendation for you

Dr. Lora Smith

MBBS (Dhaka), DGO (DU) Ex SR. Gynaecologist & Obstetrician

09 606 111 222

Diagnose Skin Disorders

Use our AI chatbot to determine your skin conditon

Diagnose Skin Disorders