TibotSkin ProblemImmunological Skin Disorder

Immunological Skin Disorder

Immunological Skin Disorder occur when the immune system cannot differentiate between healthy cells in the body and foreign substances or antigens – so it attacks them. Autoimmune disorders can affect a number of different organs, including the skin. Some types of autoimmune skin disorders include:

  • Cutaneous Lupus
  • Dermataomyositis
  • Scleroderma/Morphea
  • Vasculitis

Cutaneous Lupus

Cutaneous lupus is a skin disorder experienced by people with lupus. About two-thirds of people with lupus will experience some form of cutaneous lupus. The condition produces rashes or sores on areas of the body that have been exposed to sunlight.

There are three main forms of cutaneous lupus:

Acute cutaneous lupus only produces lesions when a person’s lupus is active. It usually presents as a sunburn-like rash on the face that often resembles a butterfly. These lesions are very sensitive to sunlight and can result in discoloration of the skin, though they do not cause scarring.

Chronic cutaneous lupus usually produces round lesions on the face or the scalp. They are typically red and thick and do not itch or burn. They can form scars over time, and may cause hair to fall out if the scars are on the scalp. If left untreated, the lesions can become cancerous.

Subacute cutaneous lupus typically produces red lesions with distinct edges. They do not typically itch or cause scarring, but they can result in discoloration of the skin. They are highly sensitive to ultraviolet rays and tend to form on areas of the body that have been exposed to sunlight.

An immune disorder is a dysfunction of the immune system. These disorders can be characterized in several different ways:

By the component(s) of the immune system affected
By whether the immune system is overactive or underactive
By whether the condition is congenital or acquired

The various types of Immunological skin disorders tracked by Tibot are:

BULLOUS (CICATRICIAL PEMPHIGOID)
DERMATITIS HERPETIFORMIS
DERMATOMYOSITIS
DRUG ERUPTIONS
LICHEN PLANUS
LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS
MORPHOEA
PEMPHIGUS
SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS (SCLERODERMA)
URTICARIA (HIVES)

The immediate reaction

Occurs as a result of degranulation of mast cells due to an antigen stimulation leading to release of mediators as histamine, leukotrienes, platelet activating factor, proteases and others. This reaction may elicit skin disorders such as in early stages of atopic eczema, urticaria and angioedema.

Investigation of this type includes: skin prick test, serum IgE and (RAST) test.

The delayed reaction

Repeated contact of a specific antigen with a previously sensitized T-cells leads to stimulation and the release of lymphokines. Lymphokines induce inflammatory reactions and activate macrophages to release mediators.

This type of reaction corresponds to the delayed type of contact dermatitis, photo-allergic dermatitis and late stages of atopic dermatitis.

Cell mediated immune reactions are common in the defense against fungal, viral, granulomatous infections of the skin and mediating reactions to insect bite.

Patch tests and lymphocyte transformation may help to detect the sensitizing allergen.

Skin tests may be of value in detecting the sensitizing antigen.

Allergy is an acquired specific alteration in the capacity of the host to react with an antigen . It is an immunological reaction depending on antigen-antibody complexes.

The allergic reaction may be immediate that occurs after exposure to the antigen or delayed taking few hours or even days or weeks to appear.

Allergic skin diseases constitute the main and bulk of skin dermatoses in children and adults .

Immune function of the skin

The skin is an environmental barrier which initiates an immune response to the penetrating foreign antigens.

This will lead to:

Destruction of infective organisms.

Neutralization and removal of the potential toxins and the damaged tissue.

The skin contains many elements of the immune system, which have been designated, the skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) or the skin immune system (SIS).

Human epidermis contains Langerhans cells, and Keratinocytes which when stimulated will synthesize several types of Cytokines that activate and induce proliferation of lymphocytes and macrophages, which contribute, induce and enhance sensitization.

The immune system functions in the skin as in other body organs are either a non-specific, (innate) or specific type, (adaptive).

Fighting against infection is the primary function of immune system. Given its strategic location in human body, skin plays an important and intrinsic role in skin immunity against infections. With the rapid development of metagenomics, we are becoming more and more knowledgeable about diversity and complexity of the microbiota on the surface of skin, mucosa, and respiratory tract.

Only from the molecular point of view based on cellular level research, can these intricate relationships be fully elucidated in the future, which will provide theoretical basis for prevention and treatment of these immunological skin diseases.

As soon as possible this patient needs to visit a doctor. Doctor will decide the treatment protocol.

  • Temple University Hospital website
  • Dr. Mahmoud Hijazy Consultant Dermatologist & Venereologist website
  • oat website
TibotSkin ProblemImmunological Skin Disorder

Immunological Skin Disorder

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

Immunological Skin Disorder occur when the immune system cannot differentiate between healthy cells in the body and foreign substances or antigens – so it attacks them. Autoimmune disorders can affect a number of different organs, including the skin. Some types of autoimmune skin disorders include:

  • Cutaneous Lupus
  • Dermataomyositis
  • Scleroderma/Morphea
  • Vasculitis

Cutaneous Lupus

Cutaneous lupus is a skin disorder experienced by people with lupus. About two-thirds of people with lupus will experience some form of cutaneous lupus. The condition produces rashes or sores on areas of the body that have been exposed to sunlight.

There are three main forms of cutaneous lupus:

Acute cutaneous lupus only produces lesions when a person’s lupus is active. It usually presents as a sunburn-like rash on the face that often resembles a butterfly. These lesions are very sensitive to sunlight and can result in discoloration of the skin, though they do not cause scarring.

Chronic cutaneous lupus usually produces round lesions on the face or the scalp. They are typically red and thick and do not itch or burn. They can form scars over time, and may cause hair to fall out if the scars are on the scalp. If left untreated, the lesions can become cancerous.

Subacute cutaneous lupus typically produces red lesions with distinct edges. They do not typically itch or cause scarring, but they can result in discoloration of the skin. They are highly sensitive to ultraviolet rays and tend to form on areas of the body that have been exposed to sunlight.

An immune disorder is a dysfunction of the immune system. These disorders can be characterized in several different ways:

By the component(s) of the immune system affected
By whether the immune system is overactive or underactive
By whether the condition is congenital or acquired

The various types of Immunological skin disorders tracked by Tibot are:

BULLOUS (CICATRICIAL PEMPHIGOID)
DERMATITIS HERPETIFORMIS
DERMATOMYOSITIS
DRUG ERUPTIONS
LICHEN PLANUS
LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS
MORPHOEA
PEMPHIGUS
SYSTEMIC SCLEROSIS (SCLERODERMA)
URTICARIA (HIVES)

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