TibotSkin ProblemPsoriasis

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic, noncommunicable, painful, disfiguring and disabling disease for which there is no cure and with great negative impact on patients’ quality of life. It can occur at any age but is rare under 10 years, and is most common in the age group 50–69.

One to three per cent of most populations have psoriasis, which is most prevalent in European and North American white people, uncommon in American black people and almost non-existent in American Indians.

Psoriasis is a long-lasting autoimmune disease characterized by patches of abnormal skin. These skin patches are typically red, itchy, and scaly. Psoriasis varies in severity from small, localized patches to complete body coverage. Injury to the skin can trigger psoriatic skin changes at that spot, which is known as the Koebner phenomenon.

There are five main types of psoriasis: plaque, guttate, inverse, pustular, and erythrodermic. Plaque psoriasis, also known as psoriasis vulgaris, makes up about 90 percent of cases. It typically presents as red patches with white scales on top. Areas of the body most commonly affected are the back of the forearms, shins, navel area, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis has drop-shaped lesions. Pustular psoriasis presents as small non-infectious pus-filled blisters.[10] Inverse psoriasis forms red patches in skin folds. Erythrodermic psoriasis occurs when the rash becomes very widespread, and can develop from any of the other types. Fingernails and toenails are affected in most people with psoriasis at some point in time. This may include pits in the nails or changes in nail color.

The following different types of Psoriasis is tracked by Tibot

ARTHROPATHIC PSORIASIS (PSORIATIC ARTHIRITIS)
FLEXURAL PSORIASIS (INVERSE PSORIASIS)
GUTTATE PSORIASIS
PLAQUE PSORIASIS (PSORIASIS VULGARIS)
PUSTULAR PSORIASIS

Psoriasis involves the skin and nails, and is associated with a number of comorbidities. Skin lesions are localized or generalized, mostly symmetrical, sharply demarcated, red papules and plaques, and usually covered with white or silver scales. Lesions cause itching, stinging and pain. Between 1.3% and 34.7% of individuals with psoriasis develop chronic, inflammatory arthritis (psoriatic arthritis) that leads to joint deformations and disability. Between 4.2% and 69% of all patients suffering from psoriasis develops nail changes. Individuals with psoriasis are reported to be at increased risk of developing other serious clinical conditions such as cardiovascular and other noncommunicable diseases. 

The precise cause of psoriasis is still unknown. However, there is often a genetic predisposition, and sometimes an obvious environmental trigger. There are two key abnormalities in a psoriatic plaque: hyperproliferation of keratinocytes; and an inflammatory cell infiltrate in which neutrophils and TH-1 type T lymphocytes predominate. Each of these abnormalities can induce the other, leading to a vicious cycle of keratinocyte proliferation and inflammatory reaction; but it is still not clear which is the primary defect. Perhaps the genetic abnormality leads first to keratinocyte hyperproliferation that, in turn, produces a defective skin barrier allowing the penetration by, or unmasking of, hidden antigens to which an immune response is mounted. Alternatively, the psoriatic plaque might reflect a genetically determined reaction to different types of trauma (e.g. physical wounds, environmental irritants and drugs) in which the healing response is exaggerated and uncontrolled. 

To prove the primary role of an immune reaction, putative antigens (e.g. bacteria, viruses or autoantigens) that initiate the immune response will have to be identified. This theory postulates that the increase in keratinocyte proliferation is caused by inflammatory cell mediators or signalling. Theories about the pathogenesis of psoriasis tend to tag along behind fashions in cell biology, and this idea is currently in vogue. 

Treatment of psoriasis is still based on controlling the symptoms. Topical and systemic therapies as well as phototherapy are available. In practice, a combination of these methods is often used. The need for treatment is usually life-long and is aimed at remission. So far, there is no therapy that would give hope for a complete cure of psoriasis. Additionally, care for patients with psoriasis requires not only treating skin lesions and joint involvement, but it is also very important to identify and manage common comorbidity that already exists or may develop, including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases as well as psychological conditions. 

Skin lesions are similar to each other. So, to confirm diagnosis, need to visit a doctor. Also need to educate, how to control disease, how to live with it. Moreover, before using medication, need to see a doctor. 

  • World Health Organization(WHO)
  • Clinical Dermatology
TibotSkin ProblemPsoriasis

Psoriasis

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

Psoriasis is a chronic, noncommunicable, painful, disfiguring and disabling disease for which there is no cure and with great negative impact on patients’ quality of life. It can occur at any age but is rare under 10 years, and is most common in the age group 50–69.

One to three per cent of most populations have psoriasis, which is most prevalent in European and North American white people, uncommon in American black people and almost non-existent in American Indians.

Psoriasis is a long-lasting autoimmune disease characterized by patches of abnormal skin. These skin patches are typically red, itchy, and scaly. Psoriasis varies in severity from small, localized patches to complete body coverage. Injury to the skin can trigger psoriatic skin changes at that spot, which is known as the Koebner phenomenon.

There are five main types of psoriasis: plaque, guttate, inverse, pustular, and erythrodermic. Plaque psoriasis, also known as psoriasis vulgaris, makes up about 90 percent of cases. It typically presents as red patches with white scales on top. Areas of the body most commonly affected are the back of the forearms, shins, navel area, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis has drop-shaped lesions. Pustular psoriasis presents as small non-infectious pus-filled blisters.[10] Inverse psoriasis forms red patches in skin folds. Erythrodermic psoriasis occurs when the rash becomes very widespread, and can develop from any of the other types. Fingernails and toenails are affected in most people with psoriasis at some point in time. This may include pits in the nails or changes in nail color.

The following different types of Psoriasis is tracked by Tibot

ARTHROPATHIC PSORIASIS (PSORIATIC ARTHIRITIS)
FLEXURAL PSORIASIS (INVERSE PSORIASIS)
GUTTATE PSORIASIS
PLAQUE PSORIASIS (PSORIASIS VULGARIS)
PUSTULAR PSORIASIS

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