TibotSkin ProblemAcne & RosaceaNeonatal Acne

Neonatal Acne

Neonatal acne is a common, usually temporary skin condition that develops on a baby’s face or body. It results in tiny red or white bumps or pimples. In almost all cases, the acne resolves on its own without treatment no scarring.

Neonatal acne is also known as baby acne. Neonatal acne may occasionally be present at birth. But, in most cases it develops within two to four weeks after birth. And it may last for a few days or weeks, though some cases may last for several months.

Neonatal acne is like acne in adolescents and adults; Neonatal acne usually appears as red bumps or pimples. White pustules or whiteheads may also develop, and reddish skin may surround the bumps.

Babies can develop acne anywhere on their face, but it’s most common on their cheeks. Some babies may also have acne on their upper back or neck and also in cheeks, nose and forehead.

Acne may become more pronounced if baby is fussy or crying. Rough fabrics can irritate the acne, as can vomit or saliva that stays on the face.

It’s unclear why Neonatal acne develops. Experts often point to the hormones that babies receive from their mother at the end of pregnancy as a cause of baby acne. Some medications trigger Neonatal acne both baby and mother from breastfeeding. Also some baby reacting to a skincare product, particularly an oily one that can block pores.

Neonatal acne usually disappears without treatment.

While you wait for baby’s acne to clear, there are things you can do to help keep the skin as healthy as possible.

Sometimes baby’s acne doesn’t clear up after several months of home treatment. At that time 2.5 percent benzoyl peroxide lotion may use.

In rare cases, an antibiotic will need, like erythromycin or isotretinoin, so that baby doesn’t have permanent scars. For babies, this is usually only necessary for severe acne caused by an underlying medical condition.

Home care:

Face clean

Wash baby’s face daily with warm water. Don’t need to use anything but water. May use for a mild soap or soap-free cleanser.

Avoid harsh products

Adult medications aren’t usually recommended for babies.

Avoid to use any scented soaps, bubble bath, or other types of soaps that contain excessive chemicals.

Avoid lotions

Lotions and creams may aggravate baby’s skin and make the acne worse. So, avoid it.

Don’t scrub the area

Scrubbing the skin with a towel can aggravate the skin. Instead, gently sweep a washcloth over the face in circular motions.

Once the cleanser is washed off, use a towel to pat baby’s face dry.

Don’t squeeze acne

Avoid pinching or squeezing the acne. It may worsen the problem.

There’s no treatment for Neonatal acne, but should still consult the pediatrician if anyone worried about it.

See a doctor right away if baby’s acne results in blackheads, pus-filled bumps, or inflammation. Pain or discomfort should also prompt a visit to the doctor.

If baby’s acne doesn’t clear up after several months of home treatment, need to visit a pediatrician.

Neonatal acne itself does not recur, but it would be good to note that if child gets acne again before puberty, they should see their doctor as this could be a sign of an underlying problem.

Andrew’s Diseases of the skin.

TibotSkin ProblemAcne & RosaceaNeonatal Acne

Neonatal Acne

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Neonatal acne is a common, usually temporary skin condition that develops on a baby’s face or body. It results in tiny red or white bumps or pimples. In almost all cases, the acne resolves on its own without treatment no scarring.

Neonatal acne is also known as baby acne. Neonatal acne may occasionally be present at birth. But, in most cases it develops within two to four weeks after birth. And it may last for a few days or weeks, though some cases may last for several months.

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Dr. Lora Smith

MBBS (Dhaka), DGO (DU) Ex SR. Gynaecologist & Obstetrician

09 606 111 222

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