Chancroid

Chancroid is a sexually transmissible genital ulcer disease. The bacterium that causes chancroid, (Haemophilus ducreyi), is passed from person to person with an infected person. Chancroid begins as an inflammatory macule or pustule 1-5 days, or rarely as long as 2 weeks, after intercourse. Another feature of this infection is the fact that the sores may start bleeding or producing contagious fluid when it comes to oral, anal or vaginal intercourse. It should also be kept in mind that this disease can also be transmitted from skin to skin.

If chancroid is not treated, the ulcers will persist and will slowly and progressively get bigger. They can destroy areas of skin and genital tissues and the infected glands can rupture.

The symptoms may vary in men and women, but typically they begin four to seven days after exposure.

Men

Men may notice a small, red bump on their genitals that may change to an open sore within a day or two. The ulcer may form on any area of the genitals, including the penis and scrotum. The ulcers are frequently painful.

Women

Women may develop four or more red bumps on the labia, between the labia and anus, or on the thighs. The labia are the folds of skin that cover the female genitals. After the bumps become ulcerated, or open, women may experience a burning or painful sensation during urination or bowel movements.

Additional symptoms in men and women

The following symptoms can occur in both men and women:

  • The ulcers can vary in size and are usually anywhere from 1.8 to 2 inches across.
  • The ulcers have a soft center that’s gray to yellowish-gray with defined, or sharp, edges.
  • The ulcers may bleed easily when touched.
  • Pain may occur during sexual intercourse or while urinating.
  • Swelling in the groin, may occur.
  • Swollen lymph nodes can break through the skin and lead to large abscesses, or collections of pus, that drain.

Many cases of extra-genital infection on the hands, eyelids, lips, or breast have been reported.

Chancroid is a bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by infection with gram-negative bacillus Haemophilus ducreyi. Unprotected sexual act can cause chancroid. This disease can also be transmitted from skin to skin.

Chancroid may be successfully treated with medication or surgery.

Medication

Chancroid is treated with antibiotics. Antibiotics may also help decrease the chance of scarring as the ulcer heals. Pain killers may be taken if the ulcers are painful.

  • Azithromycin – 1 g orally (PO) as a single dose or
  • Ceftriaxone – 250 mg intramuscularly as a single dose or
  • Erythromycin base – 500 mg PO 3 times daily for 7 days or
  • Ciprofloxacin – 500 mg PO twice daily for 3 days

Azithromycin and ceftriaxone as single-dose treatments have the advantage of observed compliance.

Ceftriaxone is the treatment of choice in pregnant women, although data have suggested that ciprofloxacin presents a low risk to the fetus during pregnancy with potential toxic effects during breastfeeding.

Sexual partners of patients with chancroid should be examined and treated regardless of the presence of symptoms if they had sexual contact within 10 days preceding the onset of symptoms.

Surgery

Doctor may drain a large and painful abscess in lymph nodes with a needle or through surgery. This reduces swelling and pain as the sore heals but might cause some light scarring at the site.

It is important to complete the course of antibiotics and attend follow-up visits to ensure that the infection has been cured.

  • Roxburgh’s common skin diseases
  • Andrew’s Diseases of the skin

Chancroid

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

Chancroid is a sexually transmissible genital ulcer disease. The bacterium that causes chancroid, (Haemophilus ducreyi), is passed from person to person with an infected person. Chancroid begins as an inflammatory macule or pustule 1-5 days, or rarely as long as 2 weeks, after intercourse. Another feature of this infection is the fact that the sores may start bleeding or producing contagious fluid when it comes to oral, anal or vaginal intercourse. It should also be kept in mind that this disease can also be transmitted from skin to skin.

If chancroid is not treated, the ulcers will persist and will slowly and progressively get bigger. They can destroy areas of skin and genital tissues and the infected glands can rupture.

Recommendation for you

Dr. Lora Smith

MBBS (Dhaka), DGO (DU) Ex SR. Gynaecologist & Obstetrician

09 606 111 222

Analyze Skin Disorders

Use our AI chatbot to determine your skin conditon

Analyze Skin Disorders