Rosacea

Unlike common acne, rosacea is not primarily a plague of teenagers but occurs most often in adults, especially in those with fair skin. Different than acne, there are usually no blackheads or whiteheads in rosacea. 

Rosacea is a common, chronic, incurable, adult acne-like skin condition that is easily controllable and medically manageable. Its peak incidence is in the thirties and forties, it can also be seen in the young or old. It may coexist with acne but is distinct from it. Rosacea commonly affects the central third of the face, especially the nose, and its intensity varies over time. It is more common in women than men. There is erythema with prominent blood vessels. Pustules, papules, and oedema occur. Rhinophyma, with thickened erythematous skin of the nose and enlarged follicles, is a variant. Conjunctivitis and blepharitis may be associated. It is usually made worse by sunlight. 

Symptoms often begin with episodes of flushing, where the skin turns red for a short period. When condition progress, other symptoms can develop, such as:  

  • A rash affecting the central face, usually in a symmetrical pattern, but on occasion it can be strikingly asymmetrical. 
  • burning and stinging sensations  
  • redness of the face, 
  • spots like: papules(brownish yellow) and pustules 
  • tiny red pimples and fine red vascular lines like: telangiectasias on the facial skin, 
  • an enlarged, bulbous red nose, like W.C. Fields called rinophyma, and 
  • small blood vessels in the skin becoming visible 
  • eye problems, such as swollen, red eyelids (blepharitis), conjunctivitis, and rosacea keratitis. 

When rosacea first develops, it may appear, then disappear, and then reappear. 

The exact cause of rosacea is still unknown. The basic process seems to involve dilation of the small blood vessels of the face. Rosacea patients may have a genetically mediated reduction in the ability to dampen facial inflammation that is incited by environmental factors such as sunburn, demodicosis (Demodex folliculorum in the hair follicles), flushing, and certain medications. Rosacea tends to affect the blush areas of the face and is more common in people who flush easily. 

Some triggers are cause rosacea to flare. Like: emotional factors: stress, fear, anxiety, embarrassment etc, may trigger blushing and aggravate rosacea. Changes in the weather, like strong winds, or a change in the humidity can cause a flare-up. Sun exposure and sun-damaged skin is associated with rosacea. Exercise, alcohol consumption, smoking, emotional upsets, and spicy food is other well-known triggers that may aggravate rosacea. Many patients may also notice flares around the holidays. 

Rosacea risk factors include fair skin like: English, Irish, or Scottish heredity, easy blushing, and having positive family history. Additional risk factors include female gender, menopause, and being 30-50 years of age. 

The exact cause of rosacea is still unknown. The basic process seems to involve dilation of the small blood vessels of the face. Rosacea patients may have a genetically mediated reduction in the ability to dampen facial inflammation that is incited by environmental factors such as sunburn, demodicosis (Demodex folliculorum in the hair follicles), flushing, and certain medications. Rosacea tends to affect the blush areas of the face and is more common in people who flush easily. 

Some triggers are cause rosacea to flare. Like: emotional factors: stress, fear, anxiety, embarrassment etc, may trigger blushing and aggravate rosacea. Changes in the weather, like strong winds, or a change in the humidity can cause a flare-up. Sun exposure and sun-damaged skin is associated with rosacea. Exercise, alcohol consumption, smoking, emotional upsets, and spicy food is other well-known triggers that may aggravate rosacea. Many patients may also notice flares around the holidays. 

Rosacea risk factors include fair skin like: English, Irish, or Scottish heredity, easy blushing, and having positive family history. Additional risk factors include female gender, menopause, and being 30-50 years of age. 

  • It is advisable to seek a doctor care for the proper evaluation and treatment of rosacea. 
  • To treated properly & avoid scarring.  
  • Don’t expect results comes shortly. 
  • ABC Of Dermatology, 
  • Clinical Dermatology, 
  • Oxford hand Book of medical Dermatology 

Rosacea

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

Unlike common acne, rosacea is not primarily a plague of teenagers but occurs most often in adults, especially in those with fair skin. Different than acne, there are usually no blackheads or whiteheads in rosacea. 

Rosacea is a common, chronic, incurable, adult acne-like skin condition that is easily controllable and medically manageable. Its peak incidence is in the thirties and forties, it can also be seen in the young or old. It may coexist with acne but is distinct from it. Rosacea commonly affects the central third of the face, especially the nose, and its intensity varies over time. It is more common in women than men. There is erythema with prominent blood vessels. Pustules, papules, and oedema occur. Rhinophyma, with thickened erythematous skin of the nose and enlarged follicles, is a variant. Conjunctivitis and blepharitis may be associated. It is usually made worse by sunlight. 

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Dr. Lora Smith

MBBS (Dhaka), DGO (DU) Ex SR. Gynaecologist & Obstetrician

09 606 111 222

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