Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis). This infection is easily spread because it often causes no symptoms and may be unknowingly passed to sexual partners. About 75% of infections in women and 50% in men are without symptoms.

Chlamydia infection can affect several organs including the penis, vagina, cervix, urethra, anus, eye, and throat and can cause serious and sometimes permanent damage to the reproductive system. Chlamydia can cause health problems later, including preventing women from getting pregnant or even endangering their pregnancies.

Unprotected sex need to get tested every time exposed to make sure about infections.

The treatment for chlamydia is oral antibiotics given either in multiple doses or just one dose. Take all medication as prescribed until the pills are gone. Waiting too long to treat chlamydia can cause serious complications.

Genital chlamydia occurs in both men and women, though up to 50% of infected men and 75% of infected women may not have any symptoms, and may not know they have the infection.

Chlamydia trachomatis can cause conjunctivitis (inflammation of the lining of the eyelids and eye) in both adults and babies. Babies born to infected mothers can become infected as they pass through the infected cervix and may develop conjunctivitis or pneumonia (lung infection or inflammation) caused by Chlamydia soon after birth.

A small proportion of people infected with Chlamydia trachomatis develop joint pain.

Having Chlamydia infection does not result in immunity, and so re-infection is common. It is likely that the most serious complications (infertility, pelvic inflammatory disease and blindness) are the result of repeated infections.

If the rectum is affected in men or women, it can cause anal irritation. Most people, though, have no symptoms at all.

 

In Males

In men, Chlamydia may produce a urethritis (infection of the urethra, the urinary canal leading from the bladder to exit at the tip of the penis). A discharge from the penis may be present but many infections have no symptoms. Occasionally, infection may spread to the epididymis (storage tubes for sperm that are on top of the testes), which can be very painful and may lead to infertility.

Chlamydia symptoms also includes in man:

  • swelling around the testicles,
  • Small amounts of clear or cloudy discharge from the tip of the penis.

 

 

In Females

Most infected women are without symptoms, even who suffer the most serious consequences of genital Chlamydia infections. In women, the cervix (opening of the uterus at the top of the vagina) becomes infected. From the cervix, the infection may spread to the Fallopian tubes, which are tubes leading from the ovary to the uterus, causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Pelvic inflammatory disease due to Chlamydia is often without symptoms but if untreated may lead to scarring of the Fallopian tubes and ectopic (tubal) pregnancy or infertility. PID is a medical emergency. The symptoms of PID are:

  • fever
  • severe pelvic pain
  • nausea
  • abnormal vaginal bleeding between periods

Chlamydia symptoms also includes in women:

  • painful sexual intercourse in women (dyspareunia)
  • Bleeding between periods

Chlamydia may be transmitted by unprotected oral, anal, or vaginal sex with an infected person. Touching genitals together may transmit the bacteria. Sex without a condom and unprotected oral sex with an infected person are the main ways a Chlamydia infection spread. Condoms reduce the risk of transmission. Patients don’t have to experience penetration to get it.

Patients can get a chlamydia infection in the eye through oral or genital contact with the eyes, but this isn’t common.

Chlamydia cannot be transmitted through:

  • contact with a toilet seat that already used by an infected person
  • sharing a sauna or a swimming pool with infected people
  • inhaling the air after they have coughed or sneezed

Sometimes, the infection leads to complications for the infant, such as pneumonia. If a mother has a chlamydia infection during pregnancy, she will require a test 3 to 4 weeks after treatment to ensure the infection has not returned.

Treatment of chlamydia is very important because, if left untreated, it can cause long-term health consequences, including infertility and ectopic pregnancy. But Chlamydia is easy to treat. Since it’s bacterial in nature, it’s treated with antibiotics. Azithromycin is an antibiotic usually prescribed in a single, large dose, but the dose may also be spread out over five days. Doxycycline is an antibiotic that must be taken twice per day for about one week. Doctor may prescribe other antibiotics. Like: erythromycin levofloxacin, ofloxacin. No matter which antibiotic are given, it’s important to follow the dosage instructions carefully to make sure the infection clears up fully. This can take up to two weeks, even with the single-dose medications.

Don’t have sex during the treatment time. Patient’s can get chlamydia if exposed again, even treated for a previous infection.

Doctor will recommend, partner(s) be treated to prevent reinfection and further spread of the disease.

Women with severe chlamydia infection may require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics (medicine given through a vein), and pain medicine.

After taking antibiotics, people should be re-tested after three months to be sure the infection is cured. This is particularly important if patient are unsure that sex partner(s) obtained treatment. But testing should still take place even if sex partner has been treated. Do not have sex until sure both patient and sex partner no longer have the disease.

It is important to talk to a doctor as soon as anyone thinks that might have been exposed. The symptoms of STIs in men and women can be different, so it’s important to talk to a doctor if anyone experiences any of the symptoms.

  • Andrew’s Diseases of the skin

Chlamydia

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis). This infection is easily spread because it often causes no symptoms and may be unknowingly passed to sexual partners. About 75% of infections in women and 50% in men are without symptoms.

Chlamydia infection can affect several organs including the penis, vagina, cervix, urethra, anus, eye, and throat and can cause serious and sometimes permanent damage to the reproductive system. Chlamydia can cause health problems later, including preventing women from getting pregnant or even endangering their pregnancies.

Unprotected sex need to get tested every time exposed to make sure about infections.

The treatment for chlamydia is oral antibiotics given either in multiple doses or just one dose. Take all medication as prescribed until the pills are gone. Waiting too long to treat chlamydia can cause serious complications.

Recommendation for you

Dr. Lora Smith

MBBS (Dhaka), DGO (DU) Ex SR. Gynaecologist & Obstetrician

09 606 111 222

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