TibotSkin ProblemSuspicious TumorsSquamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of skin cancer, is an uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells arising from the squamous cells in the epidermis, the skin’s outermost layer. It is sometimes called cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma to differentiate it from very different kinds of Squamous cell carcinomas elsewhere in the body.

Squamous cell carcinomas often look like scaly red patches, open sores, warts or elevated growths with a central depression, they may crust or bleed. They can become disfiguring and sometimes deadly if allowed to grow.

Cumulative, long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun over a lifetime causes most Squamous cell carcinomas. Daily year-round sun exposure, intense exposure in the summer months or on sunny vacations and the UV produced by indoor tanning devices all add to the damage that can lead to Squamous cell carcinoma. Experts believe that indoor tanning is contributing to an increase in cases among young women, who tend to use tanning beds more than others do.

Squamous cell carcinoma is caused by changes in the DNA of these cells, which cause them to multiply uncontrollably.

Squamous cell carcinomas may occur on all areas of the body, including the mucous membranes and genitals, but are most common in areas frequently exposed to the sun, such as the rim of the ear, lower lip, face, balding scalp, neck, hands, arms, and legs. The skin in these areas often reveals telltale signs of sun damage, including wrinkles, pigment changes, freckles, age spots, loss of elasticity and broken blood vessels.

When it caught early, it’s easy to treat. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is usually not life-threatening, though it can be aggressive in some cases. Untreated, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can grow large or spread to other parts of the body, causing serious complications.

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin most often occurs on sun-exposed skin, like scalp, the backs of hands, face, hands, ears or lips. But squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can occur anywhere on the body, including the inside of the mouth, on the anus and on genitals.

Signs and symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin include:

  • Firm, red nodule,
  • Flat sore with a scaly crust,
  • Usually rough and crusty, and can bleed easily when scraped,
  • New sore or raised area on an old scar or ulcer,
  • Rough, chronic, scaly patch on a lip that may evolve to an open sore,
  • Red sore or rough patch inside the mouth,
  • Red, raised patch or wart-like sore on or in the anus or on genitals.

Skin cancer is caused by mutations that occur in skin cell DNA. These changes cause abnormal cells to multiply out of control. When this occurs in the squamous cells, the condition is known as Squamous cell carcinoma.

UV radiation is the most common cause of the DNA mutations that lead to skin cancer. UV radiation is found in sunlight as well as in tanning lamps and beds.

While frequent exposure to UV radiation greatly increases risk of skin cancer, the condition can also develop in people who don’t spend much time in the sun or in tanning beds. Sun exposure doesn’t explain skin cancers that develop on skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. These people may be genetically predisposed to skin cancer, or they may have weakened immune systems that increase their likelihood of getting skin cancer. Those who have received radiation treatment for other skin conditions may also be at greater risk of skin cancer.

Treatment for squamous cell carcinomas varies. Treatment is based on the extent and severity of cancer, age, overall health, the location of cancer. Most squamous cell carcinomas of the skin can be completely removed with relatively minor surgery or occasionally with a topical medication. Which squamous cell carcinoma of the skin treatments are best for depends on the size, location, and aggressiveness of the tumor, as well as own preferences.

Treatments may include:

  • Electrodesiccation and curettage (ED and C): ED and C treatment involves removing the surface of the skin cancer with a scraping instrument (curettage) and then searing the base of cancer with an electric needle. This treatment is often used for very small squamous cell cancers of the skin.
  • Curettage and cryotherapy: Similar to the ED and C procedure, after the tumor removal and curettage, the base and edges of the biopsy site are treated with liquid nitrogen.
  • Laser therapy: An intense beam of light vaporizes growths, usually with little damage to surrounding tissue and with a reduced risk of bleeding, swelling, and scarring. This treatment is an option for very superficial skin lesions.
  • Freezing: This treatment involves freezing cancer cells with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). It is an option for treating superficial skin lesions.
  • Photodynamic therapy: Photodynamic therapy combines photosensitizing drugs and light to treat superficial skin cancers. During photodynamic therapy, a liquid drug that makes the cancer cells sensitive to light is applied to the skin. Later, a light that destroys the skin cancer cells is shined on the area.
  • Medicated creams or lotions: In very superficial cancers, may apply creams or lotions containing anti-cancer medications directly to the skin.
  • Simple excision: In this procedure, the doctor cuts out the cancerous tissue and a surrounding margin of healthy skin. The doctor may recommend removing additional normal skin around the tumor in some cases (wide excision). To minimize scarring, especially on the face, consult a doctor skilled in skin reconstruction.
  • Lymph node surgery: remove a piece of the lymph node, uses general anesthesia.
  • Mohs surgery: During Mohs surgery, the doctor removes the cancer layer by layer, examining each layer under the microscope until no abnormal cells remain. This allows the surgeon to be certain the entire growth is removed and avoid taking an excessive amount of surrounding healthy skin.
  • Radiation therapy: Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams, like X-rays, to kill cancer cells. This may be an option for treating deeper tumors, those that have a risk of returning after surgery and tumors in people who can’t undergo surgery.
  • Topical chemotherapy: a gel or cream applied to the skin.
  • Targeted drug treatment: Topical medications, such as 5-fluorouracil and imiquimod, that are used to treat other skin cancers may also help treat squamous cell carcinomas.

Make an appointment with the doctor if have a sore or scab that doesn’t heal in about two months or a flat patch of scaly skin that won’t go away. Early diagnosis and start early treatment makes decrease hazard.

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TibotSkin ProblemSuspicious TumorsSquamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

TUI - Tibot Urgency Index

Squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of skin cancer, is an uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells arising from the squamous cells in the epidermis, the skin’s outermost layer. It is sometimes called cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma to differentiate it from very different kinds of Squamous cell carcinomas elsewhere in the body.

Squamous cell carcinomas often look like scaly red patches, open sores, warts or elevated growths with a central depression, they may crust or bleed. They can become disfiguring and sometimes deadly if allowed to grow.

Cumulative, long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun over a lifetime causes most Squamous cell carcinomas. Daily year-round sun exposure, intense exposure in the summer months or on sunny vacations and the UV produced by indoor tanning devices all add to the damage that can lead to Squamous cell carcinoma. Experts believe that indoor tanning is contributing to an increase in cases among young women, who tend to use tanning beds more than others do.

Squamous cell carcinoma is caused by changes in the DNA of these cells, which cause them to multiply uncontrollably.

Squamous cell carcinomas may occur on all areas of the body, including the mucous membranes and genitals, but are most common in areas frequently exposed to the sun, such as the rim of the ear, lower lip, face, balding scalp, neck, hands, arms, and legs. The skin in these areas often reveals telltale signs of sun damage, including wrinkles, pigment changes, freckles, age spots, loss of elasticity and broken blood vessels.

When it caught early, it’s easy to treat. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is usually not life-threatening, though it can be aggressive in some cases. Untreated, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin can grow large or spread to other parts of the body, causing serious complications.

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Dr. Lora Smith

MBBS (Dhaka), DGO (DU) Ex SR. Gynaecologist & Obstetrician

09 606 111 222

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